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  • Writer's pictureGuest Blogger

How Does Your Garden Grow?

by Melissa from Michigan

I have been trying to find the perfect seeds to start my garden since February, but what I’ve recently learned is that seed prices can be pretty high.
 

Upon further research, I found a way to get them for FREE by using my fresh WIC produce scraps. . .

Tomatoes/Cucumbers

Before eating, take a spoon and scoop the gooey seedy center right out. Place atop a wire colander, and run cool water over. The point is to remove as much pulp as possible. Next, transfer the seed mixture into a glass jar or cup and give it a good swirl with a spoon. The bad seeds will float, the good seeds will sink. Let it sit for a few days, scoop off anything that floats to the top. Give another good rinse. Lay the good seeds out on a piece of paper towel to dry. Store in a cool dry place.


Zucchini/Assorted Squash/Peppers/Melons Cut open, remove seeds. Add to a glass jar or cup for a float test. (Bad seeds float, good seeds sink.) Dry good seeds on a paper towel, and store in a cool, dry place.

Onions

You can’t grow an onion in the first year, but you CAN grow onion seeds. Take the very top, where green stems shoot up, and plant. The green stems will eventually shoot up a long stalk that will flower (this is referred to as “bolting”). In the flower is where you will find the seeds. Let the flower completely dry on the plant before harvesting. Store seeds in a cool, dry place. It is customary to plant onions in the fall.

Strawberries

Slice off a thin, flat piece of the outer skin, lay (seed side up) on a piece of paper towel to dry. Once they’re dry, scrape the seeds off. Sprinkle the dried seeds atop your potting soil, and lightly cover. They will sprout in a few weeks. As they grow, pot them in larger containers.


Involve the Kiddos

Your kids will benefit from learning how to grow their own food and watching their seeds grow. They might even be more interested in eating those fruits and veggies!


Free Greenhouses and Containers

I’ve been saving my old milk jugs (make sure to rinse) to start my seeds. When you cut the jug just under the handle, all the way around, you make yourself a little DIY greenhouse that can actually be taken outside even earlier than recommended seed sowing time.


Clear plastic bakery boxes from cookies and donuts also work great to start seeds, both indoors and out. You’ll also find that your used yogurt containers are perfect for transplanting your seedlings once they grow more.


Some people like using egg cartons to start seeds. This way will work, but you will have to transplant sooner as there is no space for the roots to stretch out.


More Free Seeds

Your local library most likely has seed packets on hand! Many times obtaining a few packets doesn’t even require a library card! A quick internet search will help you locate which local library has a “seed library” and how their program works.


 

This blog was written by one of our guest bloggers, Melissa.


About Melissa. . .

Melissa is a social media copywriter, Mother to an amazing 19 year old son, foster Mother of 7 years, and adoptive Mother of 3 Littles all under 4!! She enjoys creative writing, floral design and outdoor recreation in her free time.

Read Melissa's other posts:

 

Want recipes using WIC-approved food ingredients? Check out our free recipe collection called Health eKitchen! Visit us at www.wichealth.org today!


What are some of your favorite easy recipes? Comment below with your easy meal ideas!

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